Yes! We Have Sound: The Most Significant Albums Of 2005

I often find writing about music to be a strange and fussy preoccupation. The swash of subjectivity, refracted through blasé attempts to underline the mechanics of attraction. And should you subscribe to any notion that the records we listen to help to define us as people, disentangling the particulars of sound from this listener-gripped detail … Continue reading Yes! We Have Sound: The Most Significant Albums Of 2005

Feedback! Dissonance! Adjective! The Most Significant Albums Of 2003, Part Three

When writing about music, there’s a tendency to summon the same stock phrases. Words such as nuance, reverberation, immediacy, bite. It’s the framework through which our sonic adventures function, I guess; snatches of inner monologue that basically translate as “ooh, that’s a gorgeous bass hook”. This use of template phraseology – apart from being demonstrative … Continue reading Feedback! Dissonance! Adjective! The Most Significant Albums Of 2003, Part Three

People Should Be Continuing To Make Noise: The Most Significant Albums Of 2000, Part Two

Complementary notions. Certain records work when played back-to-back. Nothing intentional – they just seem to fit. I usually like to follow Mer De Noms, the fuzzy, début album from “rock super-group” A Perfect Circle, with Queens Of The Stone Age and their rather quite fine Rated R LP. Commercial heavy rock (for want of a … Continue reading People Should Be Continuing To Make Noise: The Most Significant Albums Of 2000, Part Two

A Birmingham Electronica Postcard

Musical identity. In some cities it’s something discernible and distinctive, filaments festooned from club to gig to rehearsal room to the record stores that feed our addiction. Manchester would be one of those places. Liverpool, perhaps; Glasgow. It’s something to do with scene, with focus, something that caresses (to recall my romanticized youth) those graceful … Continue reading A Birmingham Electronica Postcard