A Meditation Upon The Futility of Life, and Luke Haines’ ‘Raving’

So Luke Haines – man, musician, author, artist, goatherd, lower league journeyman footballer – did do a record. And not just any record; no simpering up to The Man with “Please let me do a record” plastered across his chops. No; this most modern day Peter Ustinov locked himself away in his Luke Haines room, … Continue reading A Meditation Upon The Futility of Life, and Luke Haines’ ‘Raving’

And Why Do I Own This? A Journey Through The Rarely-Played Recesses of a Record Collection

I’ve never had a record cull. I’ve lost albums, for sure – discs spirited away when the grim reaper calls time on a relationship, the final show of togetherness one of divvying up a joint collection optimistically presumed to be permanent – but items of importance would have been rapidly replaced, the remainder of which … Continue reading And Why Do I Own This? A Journey Through The Rarely-Played Recesses of a Record Collection

Review: Stewart Lee, Glasgow, 19 March (written vaguely in the style of Stewart Lee)

The clever man came to town, a sack full of satirical allegory slung across his stooped shoulders. And once his sermon had been delivered, he ensured that the assembled delegates were spat out into the night at exactly the same moment as something called “Premier League Darts” finished in the adjacent venue… There’s not a … Continue reading Review: Stewart Lee, Glasgow, 19 March (written vaguely in the style of Stewart Lee)

Albums Revisited – The Cardigans: ‘First Band On The Moon’

In January 2015, Menace Beach released debut album Ratworld to a phalanx of reviews hailing the return of ‘90’s indie. Dear old ‘90’s indie, stinking up the joint like all that incense we burnt back then. Not that it’s overt what this ‘90’s indie vibe actually represents (at least beyond the odd, fuggy adjective thrown … Continue reading Albums Revisited – The Cardigans: ‘First Band On The Moon’

Looking like Mary Queen of Scots: Thoughts on ‘Berlin’ by Lou Reed

Certain records are easy to write about. A series of statements, compact or florid, sprayed about as if the silhouette at the keyboard knows exactly what he or she is banging on about. It’s music “journalism” as stock phrases, graffiti in all but name, but still very much in thrall to the parameters our pop-culture … Continue reading Looking like Mary Queen of Scots: Thoughts on ‘Berlin’ by Lou Reed

Waiting For The Sun To Warm: Thoughts on Talk Talk’s ‘The Colour of Spring’

Should the sanctity of an album be a precious commodity, then The Colour of Spring stands testament to theme and ideal… or so I scribbled down in my notebook, on the Subway, the carriage all sneeze and sniffles, the route home waylaid by all the usual urban detritus… And we could label Talk Talk’s third … Continue reading Waiting For The Sun To Warm: Thoughts on Talk Talk’s ‘The Colour of Spring’

Anatomy of a Track: ‘The Electric Mountain’ by Jane Weaver

Currently writing a piece for another site, exploring how the mainstream’s rejection of musical invention has liberated musicians and audiences alike from such ephemeral and unrewarding pursuits as fad, image and superficiality. That whilst the charts have wilfully become a ghetto, pandering to a lowest common denominator aesthetic, the records not aimed at pre-teens or … Continue reading Anatomy of a Track: ‘The Electric Mountain’ by Jane Weaver

Anatomy of a Track: ‘Bug Powder Dust’ by Bomb The Bass

    How did twenty-one years suddenly become… well, twenty-one years ago? And other asinine questions hurled about over ales or gin cocktails when those of a certain age get together to discuss cultural landmarks. In a certain light it feels that ‘Bug Powder Dust’ was released sometime during the Hapsburg Empire. On other occasions: … Continue reading Anatomy of a Track: ‘Bug Powder Dust’ by Bomb The Bass

Anatomy of a Track: ‘The Ink’ by Dutch Uncles

    There’s something to be said for the quirky. Tracks constructed across odd angles, the counter-intuitive contours a puzzle to unpick. The joy behind a Dutch Uncles record lay in the unexpected. The key changes, the attacks on time signature, an alignment of intricate motif against routine indie-pop trope. Not so much subversion as … Continue reading Anatomy of a Track: ‘The Ink’ by Dutch Uncles

From The East Neuk With Love… A King Creosote Play-list

Words about music… I was talking to a friend in Mexico City about important records when the subject of King Creosote arose. And because neither the Scottish folk tradition nor any gleeful subversion of those musical conventions are massive in Mexico, at least yet, we discussed suitable points to begin, should familiarising yourself with the … Continue reading From The East Neuk With Love… A King Creosote Play-list